Publications

Water Imports – An Alternative Solution to Water Scarcity in Israel, Palestine, and Jordan?

Israel, Palestine, and Jordan are under absolute water stress, and the situation is getting worse. In fact, a recent study reports that despite Israel’s current maximum exploitation of fresh water resources, 30 percent more water will be required to meet the needs of its population in 2020. As for Palestine and Jordan, a recent report states that many Palestinian communities have only interrupted water supply and that two hundred villages in the West Bank are not even connected to the water grid. Among all Mediterranean countries, Turkey is most likely to supply water to Jordan, Palestine, and more especially Israel. Export is possible both practically and politically.

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Needs Analysis: Downtown East Jerusalem Businesses

The project aimed at engaging directly with the business community in Downtown East Jerusalem (DEJ) to locate reasons for and solutions to the economic decline experienced over the past years. This report presents the findings from a survey of 96 small business owners (SBOs) in DEJ. It identifies the key problems facing the SBOs and expresses the concerns of the businessmen themselves. Moreover, it includes the recommendations made in a series of town hall and representative meetings with leaders of the business community.

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Summary: Economic and Political Change in Palestine

IPCRI hosted an "Afternoons with IPCRI" public forum discussion at Haifa University on June 17, 2013 to discuss the state of Palestine’s economy, its prospects of transitioning away from an aid-based economy, and the challenges toward and implications of such a transition. Present on the panel were Orhan Niksic, Senior Economist from the World Bank for the West Bank and Gaza; Dr. Hisham Awartani, Professor of Economics at An-Najah University; and IPCRI Co-Director Dan Goldenblatt. This is a summary of the discussion.

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Analysis and Evaluation of the New Palestinian Curriculum Report I (2003)

In the past three years, the Palestinian Ministry of Education introduced a number of new textbooks and a few teachers.’This investigation report is an attempt to present a professional analysis/evaluation of the new Palestinian curriculum, especially as it relates to the principles of civil society, peace, tolerance and diversity.

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Analysis and Evaluation of the New Palestinian Curriculum Report II (2004)

The Palestinian education system has made strides in making students think more critically and collaborate with others in harmony, with the new curriculum as an example. However, in the haste to promote harmony and avoid controversy and conflict, they gloss over controversial and sensitive political and social problems and the realities of racial, ethnic, national, civil and religious identities. Palestinian education should encourage pluralism and should prepare their pupils to know themselves as well as their neighbors.

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